How and Why to UAT the Docs

How and Why to UAT the Docs

I'm passionate about getting high-quality feedback on my documentation. This is my profession, after all – I don't want to turn in shoddy work and I don't want customers to suffer with sub-par help. I'm happy to get whatever feedback I can; I'll even take spelling and grammar feedback and eat it like the delicious cookie it is. But as I've worked more and more on software development projects, I've set my sight on a new type of documentation feedback: user acceptance testing (UAT).

I don't think I've ever heard of a software team that performs docs UAT. But the more I think about it, the more it seems absurd. After all, we do software UAT to ensure customers have a chance to tell us whether our code meets their needs, has any bugs we missed, and how it can be further improved. This would also be valuable information for the documentation! And yet I've never heard of a place that does this. But why? Or better yet: why not?

6 Documentation Myths That Are Hurting Your Business

6 Documentation Myths That Are Hurting Your Business

Both the internet and bookstore are full to the brim with information about how to set up, run, manage, and get value from development teams. But for all that information, there's comparatively little about how to do the same for documentation. Docs seem to be a dark spot in the software development universe ‒ it can be hard to navigate. How do you know you're doing what's right? How do you know you're avoiding the pitfalls? And does any of it matter anyway? After all, docs don't have a profound effect on your business ‒ right?

Let's dispel 6 documentation myths that might be hurting your business.

7 UX Techniques That Will Improve Your Docs

7 UX Techniques That Will Improve Your Docs

Good user experience (UX) is quickly becoming a differentiating factor for websites and software alike. With so many options at their disposal there, users aren't incentivized to use your system when there's something else out that that’s easier to use. But UX principles don't just apply to software; your docs need to be well-designed as well. After all, what's more frustrating than going to the help only to discover that you can't find the help you need? Use these 7 techniques to find out what your users need and to put best UX practices into effect for your documentation.

4 Problems With Your Docs (And How to Solve Them)

4 Problems With Your Docs (And How to Solve Them)

So you've taken it to heart that you need documentation. It's good for your business, it's good for your brand, you stood it up and put it out there.... And still nothing is happening. Your customers are still unhappy; your support staff is still overwhelemed. But why? You have docs - aren't they doing their job? And that's exactly the question. How do you know if your docs are crap, and what do you do about it if they are?

Get ready to get your support agents to help gather clues: you'll need information about the exact problem to know where your docs are falling short.